Give Me More Money! Smart Salary Negotiation Tips for Getting What You’re Really Worth

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Jam-packed with useful information, tips, and sample negotiation dialogues. Includes salary calculator, checklists, key websites, questions to ask, mistakes to avoid, salary ranges, stock options, and much more.

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ISBN: 978-1-57023-277-0 (13-digit); 1-57023-277-6 (10-digit)

Click here to view the back cover.

By Ron and Caryl Krannich, Ph.Ds

What are you really worth? Are you underpaid by hundreds or thousands of dollars each year? What benefits should you receive and what are they worth? How can you get employers to pay you what you’re really worth?

Whether applying for a job or seeking a raise or promotion, most people underestimate their value, believe salaries are predetermined, avoid talking about money, and fail to adequately negotiate salaries, benefits, and raises.

This book reveals the major ingredients for determining salaries: secrecy, salary history, salary requirements, salary ranges, and negotiating tactics. It dispels numerous myths, outlines key salary mistakes, and reviews major compensation trends in the process of revealing how to acquire salary information and figure your worth, respond to requests for salary history, negotiate compensation, finalize the job offer, and follow up with grace.

Jam-packed with useful information, tips, and sample negotiation dialogues. Includes salary calculator, checklists, key websites, questions to ask, mistakes to avoid, salary ranges, stock options, and much more. 208 pages. 6 x 9. Softcover. March 2008.

SPECIAL QUANTITY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE. See the Product Options box above. Discounts do not include the cost of shipping.

THE AUTHORS: Ron and Caryl Krannich are authors of more than 80 books. They reside in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.

AN EXCERPT FROM CHAPTER 1, TALK MONEY TO POWER: “A Different Approach”

Our approach to this subject is different from other examinations of salaries. First, we place the salary question within the larger context of the job search, employers, and organizations.

An important principle operates here: good salary negotiation skills are based on a firm job search foundation involving knowledge of what you do well and enjoy doing – your strengths, values, goals – in order to be better able to communicate your value to employers.

This is much more than just another “you can negotiate anything” game. It is first and foremost a process of communicating value from start to finish in a job search as well as on the job. For in the end, how well you negotiate your salary may determine how well you get along with the employer and your job.

Second, to be most successful in addressing the salary question, you need both information and skills. The information comes in two forms:

  1. Information about salary issues and negotiations.
  2. Information on comparable salary ranges relevant for the jobs you seek.

Therefore, the first 10 chapters of this book address salary issues and the salary negotiation process. Chapter 11 examines key resources for determining salary ranges, including a listing of median annual salaries for 795 jobs.

While some readers will find the first 10 chapters most useful, others will be primarily oriented to the information in Chapter 11. However, we believe you need to relate both pieces of information in order to be most effective in addressing the salary question.

The skills you need are primarily research and communication skills. They focus on gathering and exchanging information about you, the employer, the job, and the organizaation both during your job search and on the job.

Our emphasis here is on developing skills that you will continuously use throughout your worklife rather than on transitory skills that are only used during a 30-minute salary negotiation period once every three to five years.

This is a long-term capability that hopefully you will use again and again in the process of continually communicating your value to employers and then translating that value into even higher salaries.

These “salary success skills” should become for you what salary survey information and the performance appraisal skill are for employers.

Better still, your salary skills should be aimed at incorporating the employer’s salary information and performance appraisal criteria into the process of determining compensation.

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